Year: 2021

  • Ernie Cecchetto

The roofing industry leaves a massive carbon footprint, no better illustrated than by the number of large gas and diesel-powered vehicles that dominate the trades vehicle pool. Many of the large firms that specialize in roof replacements have multiple tandems, tractors, boom trucks, etc. — all large carbon emitters.

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  • James Adams

In the nearly 20 years since his start in the construction industry, the Durham, Ont., native has helped build projects covering millions of square feet, taught dozens of contractors and students, worked as management in companies with employees numbering in the thousands, and go from big firms to small ones to be closer to family. That journey has brought him to RMS, where he joins us this week as Roof Operations Manager as the newest member of our team.

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  • Ernie Cecchetto

At RMS, we believe the industry at large has worked to calibrate the buyer’s expectation of appropriate service life for low-slope roofing systems. Even large-scale end-users, such as a multinational, hypermarket retailer like Wal-Mart, have reports from their own building design professionals stating that by incorporating single-ply roofing systems into their building construction, they’re acknowledging the accompanying lifespan of approximately 17 years.

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  • Ernie Cecchetto

I recently test-drove a Tesla and was thinking about what they’ve accomplished so far. Everything they’re doing to the automotive industry applies to our industry—100%.

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  • Ernie Cecchetto

Sometimes when I’m sitting around a table with a bunch of friends, I start a conversation off by asking: “Have you ever heard of designed obsolescence?” And so begins a tirade about how refrigerators and dishwashers are programmed to stop working after six years! But most people don’t really think about it much. They simply, unscrew that light bulb and replace it with another one.

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  • Ernie Cecchetto

When companies self-assess their roofing systems, they often look at the surface and draw some fairly dramatic conclusions. The roofing industry has created scary terms such as; Blistering, ridges, alligatoring, mud curling and crazing, to describe typical membrane defects.

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